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June 2014 Archives

Obstetricians unwilling to discuss certain dangers, says study

When a woman becomes pregnant, her doctor will detail a number of activities, elements and behaviors to avoid in order to protect herself -- and her unborn child -- from dangerous factors. The goal is to eliminate as many dangerous things as possible to maximize the mother's chance of a healthy birth.

Woman expects ovaries to be removed, learns she is pregnant

A 25-year-old woman who had suffered painful stomach cramps for months was scheduled to have her ovaries removed. However, during her surgery, doctors found shocking news that essentially accounted for why she had endured so much pain in the preceding months.

How will the Affordable Care Act affect medical malpractice?

Ask anyone in New Mexico what they think of the Affordable Care Act, and you are likely to get some strong opinions on one side or the other of the divisive legislation. Some love it, some hate it, and still others feel ambivalent or indifferent.

Hospital finds way to reduce medication errors by 60 percent

Medication errors can cause serious illnesses and injuries. There are many things that can go wrong to result in a dangerous medication error in New Mexico hospitals. A nurse that is administering a medication might not be able to properly make out a doctor's handwriting, and this can lead to a dosage error or even the delivery of the wrong medication. In other cases the delivery of medication is delayed for one reason or another, or medications are mixed up and given to the wrong patients. Many of these errors stem from problems with handwritten charts and orders.

Timely diabetes diagnosis imperative for patient health

When a loved one has a medical emergency, we expect doctors and hospital staff to properly diagnose what happened and what caused it. With this expectation, we put a lot of trust and confidence in our doctors to run the right tests and make the right calls when it comes to diagnosing. However, it is this high level of trust that makes failure to diagnose or delayed diagnosis cases especially difficult to emotionally deal with.

Simple fix could greatly reduce prescription errors

Continuing our theme from our last post about medication errors, it appears that a new tactic for fighting serious and possibly fatal prescription mistakes could save thousands of lives -- if only it were widely used. Unlike the medication error that we talked about in our last post, which seems to be perpetuated by sheer ignorance and laziness, the medication errors we're talking about today come from confusion and the simple fact that people are bound to make mistakes now and then.

Antibiotic prescription for acute bronchitis unnecessary

Imagine for a moment that you go into the doctor's office with acute bronchitis -- a very specific set of circumstances, mind you, but stick with us on this one. Your doctor checks on you and concludes that you do indeed have acute bronchitis, and that the way to treat this condition is to write you a prescription for antibiotics.

Healthy kidney tossed in botched transplant case

A recent case of medical malpractice shows the unfortunate roadblocks that are placed in front of victims of poor medical care. We are talking about medical malpractice caps, which limit the amount of money a plaintiff can earn in their lawsuit. The case isn't from New Mexico, which is important because the caps and limits change from state to state. Still, the story raises some very important points.