The Law Offices of Salazar, Sullivan & Jasionowski
Call now for a Free Initial Consultation
(888) 819-2544 | (505) 349-4003

Dedicated Personal Service For The Injured Free Confidential Consultations

Suggestions for helping those suffering with brain injuries

New Mexico residents whose loved one or friend is recovering from a traumatic brain injury might be interested in reading about the effects of the injury and ways to assist the victim. Several tips may assist friends and relatives to understand what these people are experiencing and how they can help them as they try to get back to normal.

Many people assume that a person who is recovering from a severe brain injury is fine simply because the individual has the ability to walk and speak. However, this is not always the case for most TBI patients. In the first place, it can take several months to many years for people with a traumatic brain injury to fully recover. During that time, they may be struggling with various symptoms such as vertigo, reoccurring headaches, memory loss and exhaustion. They might also have difficulties with focusing and concentrating.

Friends and relatives can help a person suffering with a severe brain injury assisting with household chores, purchasing groceries or cooking a meal. These acts of kindness will help the patient to relax and get some much-needed rest.

Lastly, simple gestures such as bringing flowers and a care package or sending a card can be encourage a TBI victims who may feel isolated. Offering to take them to a doctor's appointment or a park, for example, will help uplift their spirit during a hard time in their life.

A family member of a victim suffering from permanent brain damage due to a hospital error or a negligent medical professional might wish to retain an attorney who may determine if the victim is eligible to pursue compensation through a medical malpractice lawsuit. Damages typically sought include medical expenses and other economic losses.

Source: The Huffington Post, "10 Ways You Can Help a Loved One Cope With Their Traumatic Brain Injury", Amy Zellmer, Aug. 26, 2015

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information