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June 2016 Archives

Possible hepatitis B exposure for dialysis patients

New Mexico patients who get dialysis might want to make sure that the facility where the procedure is done follows guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in screening for hepatitis B. In Seattle, a hospital has announced that around 650 patients may have been exposed to the disease due to improper screening.

Family says pharmaceutical error caused child's death

New Mexico parents may have heard about an 8-year-old boy who died on June 8 after he was given the wrong dosage of his hyperactivity medication. His family believes that the pharmaceutical error contributed to his death.

Problems with MRI positioning in breast cancer patients

Some New Mexico residents may know that a study performed in a Boston hospital shows that MRIs conducted before breast surgery may be inadequate due to patient positioning. A group of radiologists at the hospital conducted the study using a dozen female patients with breast cancer. Of this number, six of the women had MRIs before and after surgery.

Reducing medication errors by EMS personnel

Working in a fast-paced environment with access to little information, New Mexico paramedics and other EMS workers have to make decisions quickly. However, this may lead to errors or witnessing others making errors that could be prevented. With job aides and standardized checklists, it may be possible to reduce the number of errors that occur. It is important to understand that anyone could possibly make an error as the human element is one that no one can completely avoid.

Standard rules could keep New Mexico patients safe

According to the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, medical errors harm 1.5 million Americans annually. A lack of standardization revolving around liquid oral and IV medications is thought to be one of the top issues. Typically, a patient may have an IV inserted while in an ambulance on the way to the hospital and have it removed and replaced when he or she gets to the hospital.

The importance of getting another medical opinion

New Mexico residents may be left wondering if they should obtain a second opinion about their medical condition. This may be a good idea, especially considering the fact that each year around the country, 12 million individuals are given a misdiagnosis, making it one of the leading causes of fatalities in the United States.

Dehydration tests not always accurate in New Mexico

Dehydration can lead to a number of problems for people, especially for senior citizens. If someone is dehydrated, they may become thirsty or tired, develop dry skin or feel like their mouth is dry and sticky. In some cases, dehydration may lead to heat stroke, so people should not ignore these symptoms.

Botched plastic surgery causes brain damage in Florida woman

The mother of a Miami woman who suffered brain damage during plastic surgery is speaking out to warn others about the potential dangers of elective procedures. Her story is a reminder that people in New Mexico and nationwide should always check the performance record of their plastic surgeon before undergoing a cosmetic procedure.

IPF patients experience high rate of misdiagnosis

Some New Mexico who are experiencing pulmonary disease symptoms might want their physicians to rule out idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. According to information published by the outreach organization Sounds of IPF, physicians initially misdiagnose over 50 percent of people later identified to have IPF. Between one and two years is the average time that passes before a patient receives an accurate diagnosis.

Factors to weigh before filing a medical malpractice claim

When a person in New Mexico is the victim of a medical mistake and it leads to a worsening of the issue, long-term impact and even death, the initial response is to consider a legal filing for compensation. Beforehand, however, there are certain issues to take into account.

Study finds failure to diagnose in remote medicine

Those suffering skin disorders in New Mexico may soon be rethinking the idea of saving money through diagnosis and treatment at a distance. The practice of remote medical care, known as teledermatology, which has grown in popularity, was reviewed in a recent study for the Journal of the American Medical Association. Among the problems noted were failure to diagnose the correct disorder, poor adherence to accepted guidelines and poor disclosure of adverse effects of prescribed treatments.

Man disputes daughter's brain-dead diagnosis

New Mexico residents may already know about the father in California who managed to keep his daughter on life support after she had been diagnosed as brain-dead. The man's daughter, now 29 years old, entered a comatose state in 2007 that was brought on by a seizure related to her anorexia.