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September 2014 Archives

Mother alleges hospital caused child's physical, mental delays

As parents in New Mexico likely already know, mistakes in hospitals can account for a number of injuries and illnesses. One Texas woman is blaming hospital negligence for problems her now 4-year-old daughter is experiencing and has filed legal action against that hospital.

Importance of qualified medical interpreters in hospitals

The increasing numbers of individuals living in the United States whose primary languages are different than English may not be a surprise to those living in New Mexico. However, the need for qualified medical interpreters is becoming a serious concern as patients and families face challenges such as medication errors and other negative events due to poor understanding. According to statistics, 9 percent of those living in the U.S. are exposed to the risk of adverse events due to language issues. Although many patients will rely on family members to interpret in medical settings, this is discouraged because a lack of knowledge about medical terminology can contribute to poor management of a case or result in a negative outcome. It is common for experts in the medical field to be aware of cases in which inadequate interpretation has posed a serious threat to the well-being of a patient. Similar pronunciations in different languages, for example, could result in the wrong body part being identified as the source of a medical problem. Language-related medical errors may be inconsistently monitored, making it difficult to identify progress being made. Additionally, it has been noted that those who are not native speakers of the English language are less apt to raise concerns about medical errors. Additional concerns exist with professional interpreters erring in their work, inserting personal perspectives or using terms that aren't part of the language spoken by a patient. The accuracy of professional interpreters is noted as being better among those who have had a minimum of 100 hours of training time.

Causes of cerebral hypoxia

If you believe that your child suffered a serious birth injury during the birthing process because of medical negligence in New Mexico, then the law offices of Salazar, Sullivan and Jasionowski might be able to help you. Birth injuries like cerebral hypoxia could seriously affect a loved one's quality of life, and the medical expenses for long-term care may be significant. Our lawyers could carefully investigate your claims to determine if a doctor breached his or her duty of care to a patient, thus resulting in the injury.

Common failure to diagnose claims

In New Mexico and across the U.S., failure to diagnose and improper diagnosis are common medical malpractice claims that can arise in a variety of circumstances. Laws in New Mexico allow for a patient that has suffered unnecessary complications or procedures due to a failure to diagnose or improper diagnosis to file a medical malpractice lawsuit against the doctor or hospital responsible for the misdiagnosis.

Understanding the causes of cerebral palsy

While the connection with a lack of oxygen at birth and the development of cerebral palsy in a child was a common belief in the past, New Mexico parents may be interested to know that this is now thought to be a factor in only a small number of cases. Cerebral palsy results from damage to a child's developing brain or from other abnormal development issues. The result of the condition is an impact on a child's control of muscles. Although some instances are tied to brain damage during the birth process, other cases result from brain damage in utero or in the months and years following birth.

Hospital transparency may decrease number of medical errors

In New Mexico and every other state in the country, the adverse effects of hospital medical errors are a major problem. Each year, 400,000 people die as a result of hospital medical errors, making them the third-leading cause of death in the United States. Faced with these overwhelming numbers, many people in the medical community are trying to come up with ways to combat the problem of physician errors.

Prevalence of wrong-site surgery in the operating room

Patients in New Mexico who are wondering if having a surgical procedure is safe might be interested in a report on wrong-site surgery. This error occurs in orthopedic, podiatric, urological, neurosurgical and general surgery procedures. The prevalence might be largely underreported and may only represent about 10 percent of actual cases.

Medical malpractice case goes to trial

New Mexico residents may be aware of some cases of alleged malpractice by a doctor at the Gerald Champion Regional Medical Center in Alamagordo. The allegations have led to the closing of the nonprofit hospital after an overwhelming amount of malpractice claims stemming from the doctor's use of experimental, unwarranted back surgeries. Although the questionable practices began with the doctor's hiring in 2006 and continued until he left the hospital, the case has only recently come to trial.

New technology may help patients receive proper medication

Medical patients in New Mexico may now be more likely to receive the correct medications without depending entirely on the human factor. New technology has been developed in a computerized system that could be helpful in reducing errors that cause potential harm.

Neurosurgeon admits guilt in medical error

Residents in New Mexico may be able to relate to an ongoing legal dispute concerning a fatal medical error that occurred at a healthcare facility in Massachusetts. A 74-year-old woman died in November 2013 after she awoke from an operation that was supposed to be a routine procedure involving an implantable pain pump at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. The woman died from the surgery later that same day.

Lawsuit seeks to change the regulation of soccer safety

Parents of active teens in New Mexico may be interested in learning about a recent lawsuit filed against U.S. Youth Soccer and the American Youth Soccer Organization, associations that are responsible for over three million children and teenage players across the country. The action against these two organizations is part of a larger class action concussion lawsuit that was filed by former and current soccer players against multiple organizations, including FIFA.