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November 2015 Archives

Medical field still catching up with standard technology

While residents of New Mexico incorporate technology into their everyday lives, multiple studies show that the medical field tends to overlook common technology that could make communication with patients and collaboration with colleagues easier. Furthermore, technology that could potentially help reduce the number operating room and hospital errors also goes unused.

Commonly misdiagnosed conditions

According to the Institute of Medicine, people in Arizona and throughout the country will likely be misdiagnosed at least once during their lifetime. Every year, about 1 in 20 adults in outpatient care is either misdiagnosed or given a delayed diagnosis. These misdiagnoses can have serious consequences as around 10 percent of patient deaths are blamed on diagnostic errors.

Is medical malpractice a consideration in a hospital fall?

Many things can go wrong in a New Mexico hospital, but not all instances are necessarily cases of medical malpractice. For example, a visitor might slip and fall while walking through a puddle caused by a ceiling leak, which is more likely to be a matter of premises liability. When a patient slips or falls, the matter might be considered a medical malpractice issue in certain cases. Because this is a confusing area of law, it may be important to understand what factors are used to determine that malpractice or medical negligence has occurred.

Lawsuit related to unplanned pregnancies

Some New Mexico residents may have heard about a 2011 recall of birth control pills as a result of a problem in packaging. The orientation of the pills was reversed in a way that led to women beginning the month with sugar pills rather than taking them at the end of the month. The recall was voluntary, but a group of women who became pregnant are now suing the manufacturer. The lawsuit, filed against Qualitest Pharmaceuticals in Philadelphia on November 5, has as plaintiffs more than 100 women from 28 different states.

Child awarded nearly $10 million in medical malpractice case

Although New Mexico obstetricians may be encouraged to avoid unnecessary C-section deliveries, there are cases in which the life of a child or mother could be dramatically affected if this method is not used. In a California medical malpractice case, a child's brain injury was attributed to the physician's failure to act quickly enough in performing a C-section. The ruling on October 28 occurred in a federal court, awarding the child $9.6 million for the damages she has suffered.

Aspirin allergy misdiagnosis may be common in cardiac patients

Cardiac patients in New Mexico may have been told that they are allergic to aspirin and cannot use it as a treatment, but according to a new study, they might not be allergic after all. At the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting, researchers presented the results of a study that showed that while only 2.5 percent of the 5,052 patients studied had aspirin hypersensitivity, 34 percent were told they had the condition.

Extra testing lowers medical malpractice claims

According to a new study, doctors who routinely order extra tests and procedures for patients, a practice known as defensive medicine, are subjected to fewer medical malpractice lawsuits. However, the method has not been proven to improve health outcomes for patients in New Mexico and nationwide.

Symptoms for hernias are different for women and men

New Mexico patients who suffer from groin hernias may be interested to learn that women may present different symptoms than men. According to a surgeon who specializes in hernia repair, men tend to show large bulges in the area whereas women describe having intense pain without the bulge.

Heart attack risks for young women

A heart attack might seem like an unusual medical situation for a young woman, but statistics indicate that it is important for those with risk factors for heart attacks to be informed by their healthcare providers. Because heart disease is the top cause of death for females throughout the nation, New Mexico medical professionals may want to be proactive in addressing risks, even with their younger patients. Female patients, meanwhile, may want to take the initiative to ask questions about heart-related concerns, especially if their doctors don't bring these matters up during appointments.